TITLE

US Institute of Medicine urges mandatory reductions in salt content

AUTHOR(S)
Benac, Nancy
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;6/15/2010, Vol. 182 Issue 9, pE395
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a reprint of the article "US Institute of Medicine urges mandatory reductions in salt content," by Nancy Benac, which appeared at www.cmaj.ca on April 28, 2010. It says that the U.S. Institute of Medicine suggested in a report that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should set maximum sodium levels that would gradually lessen sodium content on the food supply. It mentions the food industry's response on the mandatory sodium limits in the U.S.
ACCESSION #
52221814

 

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