TITLE

Impacts of Ocean–Atmosphere Coupling on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change and Ocean Prediction in the Australian Region

AUTHOR(S)
Sandery, P. A.; Brassington, G. B.; Craig, A.; Pugh, T.
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
Monthly Weather Review;Jun2010, Vol. 138 Issue 6, p2074
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This study investigates the impact of atmosphere–ocean coupling on predicted tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change and the ocean response in the Australian region. The coupled model comprises the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s Tropical Cyclone Limited-Area Prediction System (TC-LAPS) and a regional version of the BLUElink ocean forecasting system. A series of case study forecasts are presented and the differences between coupled and uncoupled forecasts, operational forecasts, and posterior objective analyses are compared. A coupled model ensemble is also developed that uses different first-order approximations of the effects of surface waves on surface stress in an inertial coupling method. In each of the cases, the use of reanalyzed sea surface temperatures significantly improves the prediction of TC intensity change in the intensification phase. The results show that dynamic air–sea coupling has a modest impact on intensity in cases where SST cooling is significant and is likely to be important for predicting the rate of TC intensification, peak intensity, and deintensification. Results also show that there is a definite coupled signal and suggest inherent biases in the atmospheric model that could potentially be removed. With different parameterizations of surface wave effects, results show modest sensitivity in TC intensity of up to 10 hPa in minimum surface pressure; however, in some cases there was significant sensitivity in the predicted ocean response. The results also highlight the relative increased complexity of tropical cyclone prediction in the Australian region compared to other regions. In cases where the forecast TC track was reasonably skillful, there were improvements in the predicted ocean response with respect to observations compared to an ocean reanalysis.
ACCESSION #
52216396

 

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