TITLE

THE ROLE OF THE FEDERAL JUDGE UNDER THE CONSTITUTION: SOME PERSPECTIVES FROM THE NINTH CIRCUIT

AUTHOR(S)
O'Scannlain, Diarmuid F.
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy;Summer2010, Vol. 33 Issue 3, p963
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the role of the federal judge in the U.S. It provides a background on the nature of the judicial power under the U.S. Constitution. Also discussed are the technical legal rules relating to the three core judicial doctrines, namely, standing, jurisdiction and standard of review. It also argues on the role of media in the revisionist conception of the judicial role, whether the results of a certain case were consistent with some abstract notion of justice or whether the reasoning adopted was faithful to the law.
ACCESSION #
51917841

 

Related Articles

  • How Is It Determined, Anyway? Nolan, Christopher R. // TortSource;Spring2009, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p2 

    The article provides a discussion of U.S. maritime jurisdiction to round out the country's admiralty and maritime content. It looks at the U.S. Constitution which states that the judicial power of the country extends to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction. It references some cases...

  • Marriage Amendment Dead? Try Electing Judges Instead. Cameron, Paul // Insight on the News;12/9/2003, Vol. 19 Issue 26, p50 

    Comments on the absolute power of U.S. Supreme Court judges to override law, veto popular referenda and use the Constitution as a bludgeon to effect social change. Stance taken by judges against the legitimization of homosexual marriage; Key to restoring legislative power; Obstacles to the...

  • Measuring the Preferences of State Supreme Court Judges. Brace, Paul; Langer, Laura; Hall, Melinda Gann // Journal of Politics;May2000, Vol. 62 Issue 2, p387 

    Presents a study which developed the party-adjusted surrogate judge ideology measure (PAJID) as a measure of judge preferences in state supreme courts in the United States. Past approaches to measuring judicial preferences; Analysis of the effects of the PAJID and partisan affiliation on judge...

  • Magistrate bill moves to House floor.  // American Bar Association Journal;Aug78, Vol. 64 Issue 8, p1219 

    Reports on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee's approval of a bill to ease the work load of district court judges by enlarging the jurisdiction of magistrates. Key provisions of the bill; Changes in current law.

  • JUDGES ARE AT FAULT. Moss, Debra Cassens // ABA Journal;Jan1988, Vol. 74 Issue 1, p28 

    Reports on the criticism of judges concerning problems in judicial activism in the U.S. Fault of judges in causing the explosion of liability; Criticisms of court-cultivated expansion of the joint and several liability doctrine; Changes in liability law.

  • House weakens restraints on judicial tax increases.  // Human Events;05/08/98, Vol. 54 Issue 18, p23 

    Focuses on an amendment adopted by the United States House on April 23, 1998, to the Limits of Federal Judges' Power Act, designed to curb judicial activism. Who proposed the amendment; Arguments by Represenative William Delahunt, democrats for Massachusetts.

  • Burger says judges must keep caseload flowing.  // American Bar Association Journal;Feb79, Vol. 65 Issue 2, p175 

    Reports on the role of judges in ensuring the delivery of justice in the U.S. Effect of control of pre-trial processes on early disposition, either by trial or settlement; Elimination of diversity jurisdiction as well as mandatory jurisdiction in the Supreme Court; Impending addition of a...

  • The Swing Voter Who Matters Most. Stengel, Richard // Time;6/18/2012, Vol. 179 Issue 24, p6 

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses a cover story on U.S. Supreme Court justice Anthony Kennedy, which includes information on Kennedy's approach towards his casework, his unpredictable voting pattern, and his views on the U.S. Constitution.

  • Justices Shouldn't Split Hairs When it Comes to the Constitution. Allen, David // State Journal (WV);7/13/2012, Vol. 28 Issue 27, p27 

    The author reflects on the division of the U.S. Supreme Court justices in analyzing the U.S. Constitution.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics