TITLE

Supracondylar Osteotomy of the Humerus to Correct Cubitus Varus: Do Both Internal Rotation and Extension Deformities Need to Be Corrected?

AUTHOR(S)
Takagi, Takehiko; Takayama, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Horiuchi, Yukio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Ikegami, Hiroyasu
PUB. DATE
July 2010
SOURCE
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;Jul2010, Vol. 92-A Issue 7, p1619
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background A variety of osteotomies has been proposed to correct posttraumatic cubitus varus deformity as well as any associated hyperextension and/or rotational deformities. However, lateral closing-wedge osteotomy and step-cut osteotomy, both of which have been used extensively with satisfactory outcomes, correct only in the coronal plane. To date, no direct comparison has been made between three-dimensional and simple coronal plane osteotomies. Methods Between 1983 and 2007, we treated eighty-six elbows with a posttraumatic varus deformity. We classified patients who underwent three-dimensional osteotomies as Group I and those who underwent simple coronal plane osteotomies as Group II, and we compared the outcomes between the groups. Clinical evaluation included an assessment of the carrying angle and measurement of the passive range of motion before surgery and at the time of the final follow-up. To evaluate the remodeling capacity of the bone to recover elbow flexion in Group II, we assessed the range of motion before surgery and at the time of the final follow-up in patients who were less than ten years old and those who were more than ten years old. Results There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to the carrying angle or the elbow range of motion, either before surgery or at the time of the final follow-up. However, Group I had more significant loss of correction (p = 0.018). In Group II, elbow motion reached the physiological range by the time of the final follow-up in patients who were less than ten years old. Conclusions For osteotomies to correct cubitus varus deformity, correction of internal rotation is not needed. With a three-dimensional osteotomy, it is difficult to maintain correction and to acquire the planned carrying angle because of the small area of bone contact. It is necessary to correct hyperextension in patients older than ten years of age, as after that age bone remodeling is not expected to increase elbow flexion. Level of Evidence Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
ACCESSION #
51901659

 

Related Articles

  • Emerging Technologies ACADEMIC.  // R&D Magazine;Jan2004, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p46 

    Presents news briefs on U.S. academic emerging technologies as of January 2004. Development of an experimental smart house by researchers at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida that offers elderly people the assistance they require, automatically; Information on the use of a...

  • Emerging Technologies ACADEMIC.  // R&D Magazine;Jan2004, Vol. 46 Issue 1, p46 

    Presents news briefs on U.S. academic emerging technologies as of January 2004. Development of an experimental smart house by researchers at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida that offers elderly people the assistance they require, automatically; Information on the use of a...

  • Sagittal Cutting Error Changes Femoral Anteroposterior Sizing in Total Knee Arthroplasty. Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Okazaki, Ken; Tashiro, Yasutaka; Iwamoto, Yukihide // Clinical Orthopaedics & Related Research;Dec2012, Vol. 470 Issue 12, p3560 

    Background: Prosthetic alignment and size are important factors in achieving a long-term survival in TKA. Although two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) planning for component sizing has been introduced, it sometimes is difficult to cut the bones accurately according to preoperative...

  • Incidence and outcome of atlanto-occipital dissociation at a level 1 trauma centre: a prospective study of five cases within 5 years. Mueller, Franz; Kinner, Bernd; Rosskopf, Michael; Neumann, Carsten; Nerlich, Michael; Fuechtmeier, Bernd // European Spine Journal;Jan2013, Vol. 22 Issue 1, p65 

    Background: Prospective evaluation of atlanto-occipital dissociations (AODs) at a level 1 trauma centre within 5 years. Methods: Over a period of 5 years (2005-2009), all CT scans of the skull base and the upper cervical spine due to traumatic injuries were prospectively entered into a database....

  • Cognitive processing of emotional information in posttraumatic stress disorder. Kaspi, Susan P.; McNally, Richard J. // Cognitive Therapy & Research;Aug95, Vol. 19 Issue 4, p433 

    Investigates the issues concerning selective processing of emotional material in combat-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder by using computerized Stroop experiment on Vietnam veterans. Methodology of the study; Results; Discussion.

  • PTSD may take some time to develop after combat.  // Psychotherapy Letter;Nov95, Vol. 7 Issue 11, p5 

    Reports that the degree of combat exposure may be important in predicting the eventual development of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study by the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Yale University's psychiatry department. Increase of PTSD...

  • Brief therapy may prevent chronic PTSD after assault.  // Psychotherapy Letter;May96, Vol. 8 Issue 5, p5 

    Presents an abstract on the article `Evaluation of a Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Program for the Prevention of a Chronic PTSD in Recent Assault Victims,' by Edna B. Foa et al published in a 1995 issue of the `Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology'.

  • Which survivors will get posttraumatic stress disorder?  // Psychotherapy Letter;Jun96, Vol. 8 Issue 6, p5 

    Examines not everyone exposed to trauma develops posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychological symptoms; Factors leading to posttraumatic stress disorder.

  • Brain scans show the biology of traumatization. Susman, Ed // Psychotherapy Letter;Jun96, Vol. 8 Issue 6, p5 

    Focuses on the use of brain imaging techniques in explaining posttraumatic stress disorder. Factors leading to posttraumatic stress disorder.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics