TITLE

Print proves mettle

AUTHOR(S)
Kerwin, Ann Marie
PUB. DATE
September 2001
SOURCE
Advertising Age;9/17/2001, Vol. 72 Issue 38, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the efforts of various newspapers and magazines to cover the events of the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attack in New York City. Publications already dealing with a harsh economic climate rushed out special issues without advertising, reduced rates for memorial messages in regular issues and saw advertisers cancel pages with images that might be deemed inappropriate in the wake of the disaster. No news operation was affected as dramatically as the Wall Street Journal of Dow Jones & Co., with editorial headquarters at Liberty Street, across the street from the site of the explosions. The New York Times was able to keep the newsroom in its midtown offices in operation. it ran into distribution problems in and around Manhattan on the day after the attack. Newsweek also published a special issue which was released on September 13. That issue was also free of advertising, and was distributed only on news stands. McGraw-Hill's Business Week offered a free page to any advertisers that wanted to send a message to customers or employees. U.S. News & World Report's special issue carried no advertising and was distributed to news stands only. The periodical Economist sent an extra copies to news stands in the country and replaced its U.S. section with a special report on the attack.
ACCESSION #
5181389

 

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