TITLE

Evolving Techniques in the Treatment of Carotid Artery Kinking: The Use of Resected Redundant Arterial Segment

AUTHOR(S)
Gugulakis, A. G.; Matsagas, M. I.; Vasdekis, S. N.; Giannakakis, S. G.; Lazaris, A. M.; Sechas, M. N.
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
American Surgeon;Jan2001, Vol. 67 Issue 1, p67
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Internal carotid artery kinking is frequently accompanied by atheromatous disease at the carotid bifurcation, and in this case both lesions may be treated simultaneously. Various surgical techniques have been used to correct carotid kinking but no particular one has been widely established. We conducted a retrospective review of 18 patients operated upon for internal carotid kinking during the last 5 years, which represents 4.1 per cent of the total carotid procedures performed during the same period. In 13 of the 18 patients carotid endarterectomy was performed before the repair of the kink. In four patients resection of the kinked segment with end-to-end anastomosis was performed combined with longitudinal arteriotomy at the carotid bifurcation. Two patients developed restenosis at the site of anastomosis requiring reoperation with patch angioplasty. Three patients were treated with eversion endarterectomy and end-to-side anastomosis, whereas in six patients we performed resection of the redundant internal carotid artery combined with longitudinal arteriotomy at the bifurcation. The posterior wall was reconstructed with interrupted sutures and the procedure was completed with patch angioplasty of the anterior wall. In four of these cases we used the autogenous resected arterial segment as patch material. None of these patients developed restenosis or symptoms in a follow-up period of 3 to 32 months. In cases in which significant carotid artery stenosis and internal carotid kinking coexist resection of the involved segment with end-to-end anastomosis of the posterior wall and patch angioplasty using the resected autogenous arterial segment constitute a convenient and satisfactory method of reconstruction.
ACCESSION #
5178275

 

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