TITLE

Combined immunoelectron microscopic and computer-assisted image analyses to detect advanced glycation end-products in human myocardium

AUTHOR(S)
Donaldson, Cameron; Taatjes, Douglas J.; Zile, Michael; Palmer, Bradley; VanBuren, Peter; Spinale, Francis; Maughan, David; Von Turkovich, Michele; Bishop, Nicole; LeWinter, Martin M.
PUB. DATE
July 2010
SOURCE
Histochemistry & Cell Biology;Jul2010, Vol. 134 Issue 1, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) result from oxidation–reduction reactions that ensue when a sugar becomes adducted to a protein. AGEs cause various complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). Experimental and clinical evidence suggest that AGEs also contribute to the complications of hypertension (HTN). Little is known about the abundance and localization of AGEs in human myocardium. In a few light microscopic studies, the AGE carboxymethyl lysine (CML) has been immunolabeled and localized virtually exclusively to the walls of small arteries. To more precisely delineate the abundance and localization of CML, we developed an immunoelectron microscopic (IEM) detection method using anti-CML monoclonal antibody 6D12 in conjunction with computer-assisted image analysis. Antibody was pre-absorbed with purified AGE-bovine serum albumin to assure specificity. Antigen–antibody (ag–ab) complexes were individually identified with protein A-conjugated colloidal gold and counted with an automated system. We applied this method in 21 patients (pts) undergoing epicardial biopsy during coronary bypass grafting (CBG) [20 M, 1 F; mean age 65 ± 7.4 (± SEM) years]. Seven pts had neither DM nor HTN, seven had HTN, and seven had DM + HTN. In contrast to the prior light microscopic studies, we detected CML scattered throughout the cardiomyocyte in all pts, but in widely varying amounts. Ag–ab complexes were abundant in sections through myofilaments (mean count 23.6 ± 9.2 per μm2, range 9.4–48) and even more so in mitochondria (mean count 34.4 ± 11.9 per μm2, range 14.1–68.2, P < 0.001 vs. myofilaments). CML was also detected in vascular endothelial cells. There were no statistically significant differences based on presence or absence of HTN or DM. In conclusion, our IEM method is the first to provide detailed delineation of the localization and abundance of CML in myocardium. CML is very prevalent in CBG pts, suggesting that AGEs could play a role in abnormal cardiomyocyte function, including altered energy metabolism.
ACCESSION #
51652635

 

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