TITLE

Why Happiness is of Marginal Value in Ethical Decision-Making

AUTHOR(S)
Liszka, James
PUB. DATE
December 2005
SOURCE
Journal of Value Inquiry;Dec2005, Vol. 39 Issue 3/4, p325
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the reasons why happiness is of marginal value in ethical decision-making. With this, the author cites the views of ethical theorists on the effects of decisions on the happiness of most people. The theorists believe that decisions in all aspects of life, from birth to death, have little effect on the happiness of most people. The article also provides the reasons for the occurrence of happiness among people.
ACCESSION #
51588447

 

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