TITLE

Racial and ethnic differences in personal cervical cancer screening amongst post-graduate physicians: results from a cross-sectional survey

AUTHOR(S)
Ross, Joseph S.; Nuñez-Smith, Marcella; Forsyth, Beverly A.; Rosenbaum, Julie R.
PUB. DATE
January 2008
SOURCE
BMC Public Health;2008, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p378
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Racial and ethnic disparities in cervical cancer screening have been attributed to socioeconomic, insurance, and cultural differences. Our objective was to explore racial and ethnic differences in adherence to cervical cancer screening recommendations among female post-graduate physicians. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey at one university hospital among a convenience sample of 204 female post-graduate physicians (52% of all potential participants), examining adherence to United States Preventive Services Task Force cervical cancer screening recommendations, perception of adherence to recommendations, and barriers to obtaining care. Results: Overall, 83% of women were adherent to screening recommendations and 84% accurately perceived adherence or non-adherence. Women who self-identified as Asian were significantly less adherent when compared with women who self-identified as white (69% vs. 87%; Relative Risk [RR] = 0.79, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.64-0.97; P < 0.01). Women who self-identified as East Indian were significantly less likely to accurately perceive adherence or non-adherence when compared to women who self-identified as white (64% vs. 88%; RR = 0.73, 95% CI, 0.49-1.09, P = 0.04). Women who self-identified as Asian were significantly more likely to report any barrier to obtaining care when compared with women who self-identified as white (60% vs. 35%; RR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.24-2.47; P = 0.001) and there was a non-significant tendency toward women who self-identified as East Indian being more likely to report any barrier to obtaining care when compared with women who self-identified as white (60% vs. 34%; RR = 1.74, 95% CI, 1.06-2.83; P = 0.06). Conclusion: Among a small group of insured, highly-educated physicians who have access to health care, we found racial and ethnic differences in adherence to cervical cancer screening recommendations, suggesting that culture may play a role in cervical cancer screening.
ACCESSION #
51491793

 

Related Articles

  • Long-term use of OCs increases risk of cervical cancer.  // Contemporary OB/GYN;Jul2003, Vol. 48 Issue 7, p16 

    Reports on the study "Cervical Cancer and Use of Hormonal Contraceptives: A Systematic Review." Risk of developing cancer for women who use contraceptives.

  • A survey of physicians' attitudes and practices to Screening Mammography in Osogbo & Ibadan, South-West Nigeria. Temitope, Bello O.; Daniel, Adekanle A.; Ademola, Aremu A. // Internet Journal of Radiology;2007, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p2 

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in African women. Screening mammography helps to detect breast cancer before it becomes invasive. The study is aimed at understanding the referral practices of physicians in two cities in South Western Nigeria. Methods: Over a period of four...

  • Alarming Rise in Incidence of Lung Cancer, Lung Cancer Death in Women.  // Ascribe Newswire: Medicine;4/20/2004, p45 

    In the past fifty years, there has been a 600 percent increase in the number of women who will be diagnosed with lung cancer and die of the disease. An estimated 68,500 women will die from lung cancer this year. The increase in the number of women smokers is an obvious cause for this uptick, but...

  • Oral Cancer: Could It Happen to You?  // Heart & Soul;Apr2003, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p92 

    Discusses the probability of occurrence of cancer in the U.S. women.

  • Alarming Rise in Incidence of Lung Cancer, Lung Cancer Death in Women.  // Ascribe Newswire: Medicine;4/13/2004, p70 

    In the past fifty years, there has been a 600 percent increase in the number of women who will be diagnosed with lung cancer and die of the disease. The increase in the number of women smokers is an obvious cause for this uptick, but a recent review article suggests that genetic, metabolic...

  • Benign proliferative breast diseases among female patients at a sub Saharan Africa tertiary hospital: a cross sectional study. Okoth, Christopher; Galukande, Moses; Jombwe, Josephat; Wamala, Dan // BMC Surgery;2013, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p1 

    Background: Non-cancerous diseases of the breast have assumed increasing importance because of the public awareness of breast cancer. These benign diseases are a recognized important risk factor for later breast cancer which can develop in either breast. The risk estimate of these benign breast...

  • Consistent performance measurement of a system to detect masses in mammograms based on blind feature extraction. García-Manso, Antonio; García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Gonzílez-Velasco, Horacio; Gallardo-Caballero, Ramón; Macías, Miguel Macías // BioMedical Engineering OnLine;2013, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p1 

    Background: Breast cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer deaths among women, especially in Western countries. In the last two decades, many methods have been proposed to achieve a robust mammography-based computer aided detection (CAD) system. A CAD system should provide high...

  • outsmart breast cancer. Kashef, Ziba; Boston, Andrea; Hunter, LaShieka Purvis // Essence (Time Inc.);Oct2005, Vol. 36 Issue 6, p112 

    The article offers advice for women on lowering the risk of breast cancer. Surgeon Christine Homer claims that fresh fruits and vegetables contain phytochemicals that perform specific anticancer functions. Turmeric, a potent antioxidant found in curry, helps prevent cell damage that may lead to...

  • Looking at Bodies: Insights and Inquiries about DES-Related Cancer. Bell, Susan E.; Apfel, Roberta J. // Qualitative Sociology;Spring95, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p3 

    This paper considers the symbolic and material meanings about gender and sexuality surrounding women's bodies. To do so, it interprets three vignettes from an ongoing study of the experiences of women who have had vaginal and cervical cancer, as a result of their prenatal exposure to DES...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics