TITLE

Net losses

PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
High Country News;6/7/2010, Vol. 42 Issue 10, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the structure of several endangered fish species that live in the Colorado River. The Colorado pikeminnow has silvery sides and a green-and-gold back. Bonytail is considered as the rarest fish in the state and it has a thin tail and large fins. The humpback chub has a long snout and can grow to about 20 inches.
ACCESSION #
51469911

 

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