TITLE

Four-phase oral contraceptive approved by FDA

AUTHOR(S)
Thompson, Cheryl A.
PUB. DATE
June 2010
SOURCE
American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy;6/15/2010, Vol. 67 Issue 12, p958
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that the first oral contraceptive "Natazia" that provides four phases of estrogen-progestin therapy during the menstrual cycle has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
ACCESSION #
51218950

 

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