TITLE

ARCTIC SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS AND THE U. S. NAVY'S ROADMAP FOR THE ARCTIC

AUTHOR(S)
Titley, David W.; John, Courtney C. St.
PUB. DATE
March 2010
SOURCE
Naval War College Review;Spring2010, Vol. 63 Issue 2, p35
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses national security implications in the Arctic region developed by the U.S. Navy. The author states that the Navy has developed an Arctic Roadmap that will guide policy, investment, and action regarding the region. Themes of the initiative include improved environmental understanding, informed investments, and cooperative partnerships. The deterioration of the Arctic region by greenhouse gases is detailed. Subjects of the article also include the region's natural resources, transportation to the region, and boundary disputes of the region.
ACCESSION #
51197438

 

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