TITLE

The Gentlemanly Order & the Politics of Production in the Transition to Capitalism in the Home District, Upper Canada

AUTHOR(S)
Schrauwers, Albert
PUB. DATE
May 2010
SOURCE
Labour / Le Travail;Spring2010, Vol. 65, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the rise of class politics in Toronto, Ontario in the era around the Rebellion of 1837. In particular, the introduction of "gentlemanly capitalism" into Upper Canada by British financiers and corporations is discussed, including their creation of what are described as three "fictitious commodities": money, land, and labor. Topics discussed include the introduction of paper money, the rise of chartered corporations as an extension of state power, the creation of a land market, and the effects of these developments on the relations of production for farmers and tradesmen.
ACCESSION #
51016300

 

Related Articles

  • MARKET INTEGRATION: EARLY DEVELOPMENT ON THE CANADIAN PRAIRIES. WARD, TONY // Prairie Forum;Spring2010, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p53 

    Economic growth requires market development, and as institutions and technology progress, theory predicts that commodity prices will converge. On the early Prairies, though, we see a unique pattern of price behaviour. Prices in places not connected to export markets were initially high, and as...

  • Summary Brief: For Sale by Owner: Assessing the Changing Real Estate Market in Canada. Dunnett, A. Jane; Shannahan, Kirby L. J.; Dupuis, Rachelle J. // Society for Marketing Advances Proceedings;2009, p274 

    The purchase or sale of a home is the largest single transaction most consumers undertake in their lifetimes. During turbulent times in the economy and in the real estate markets in particular, consumers face increasing uncertainty as to their best approach to this process. Further, there is...

  • A Toronto portrait, 1857. Matheson, Neil // Beaver;Jun/Jul90, Vol. 70 Issue 3, p27 

    Presents information about the City of Toronto. History of Toronto; Previous merchants in the city; Buildings that are visible in the Panorama of Toronto; How the wide streets of Toronto gave the City an advantage; City's early industrial concerns; Disease that killed the people of Toronto in...

  • The real story of how Toronto got its name. Rayburn, Alan // Canadian Geographic;Sep/Oct94, Vol. 114 Issue 5, p68 

    Recounts the story of how Toronto got its name. Linguistic and geographical journey of Toronto's name; Origin of the name from the Mohawk word tkaronto; `Place of meeting' derived from the Huron word toronton; Toronto as name of other locations in the north shore of Ontario.

  • Map Mishap. Adams, Patrick // History Today;Nov2012, Vol. 62 Issue 11, p66 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "War of 1812," published in the October 2012 issue, in which the author notes that a map presented in the article does not label the areas of Upper Canada and Lower Canada correctly in regards to history.

  • Indian land claims flood Ottawa. Walker, Ruth // Christian Science Monitor;3/20/2001, Vol. 93 Issue 79, p6 

    Discusses the efforts of Mississaugas Indians in Canada to receive retroactive compensation for the sale of Toronto to England in 1805.

  • TRAVELING IN EASTERN CANADA: TORONTO.  // Canada: Ontario, Quebec, Atlantic Provinces (Nelles Guide);1998 2nd Edition, p44 

    Provides information on Toronto, Ontario. History and geography of the city; Description of establishments and historical buildings in the city; Other tourist destinations in Toronto.

  • British Businessmen and Canadian Confederation: Constitution-Making in an Era of Anglo-Globalization. Cruikshank, Ken // Enterprise & Society (Oxford University Press / USA);Jan2012, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p230 

    A review of the book "British Businessmen and Canadian Confederation: Constitution-Making in an Era of Anglo-Globalization," by Andrew Smith is presented.

  • Making a Living: African Canadian Workers in London, Ontario, 1861-1901. Adams, Tracey // Labour / Le Travail;Spring2011, Vol. 67, p9 

    There is a growing body of research on African Canadians in the 19th century that touches on their experiences in the workforce. Nonetheless, the literature has been largely silent on how labour market opportunities for African Canadians altered over time and, in particular, how members of this...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics