TITLE

Danger Below

AUTHOR(S)
Slavin, Al
PUB. DATE
May 2010
SOURCE
Best's Review;May2010, Vol. 111 Issue 1, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the coal mine insurance segment in the U.S. It mentions the fatal mine explosion that killed 29 miners at an underground coal mining site in West Virginia that was considered as the worst mining disaster in the country. The accident brought liability issues on the rise and became a reminder of coal mining's high-risk profile. It adds that from the casualty's standpoint, there are only few insurers in the nation.
ACCESSION #
50613565

 

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