TITLE

McGill students combine poetry, prose in remembering 'their cadavers.'

AUTHOR(S)
Pinker, Susan
PUB. DATE
August 2001
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;8/21/2001, Vol. 165 Issue 4, p461
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on memorial services for cadavers used in medical classes at McGill University in Quebec, Canada. Description of the service, created by professors, that combined students poems and personal reflections about their experiences with their subjects; Feelings provoked by the students' first-year anatomy class; Comments on the service by family members of the cadavers; Popularity of the event.
ACCESSION #
5047218

 

Related Articles

  • Honoring the E-Dead. Theil, Kay // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);04/09/2001 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 15, p62 

    Discusses the creation of the Japanese Web site esougi.com, which helps mourners deal with the logistics of funerals. Inspiration from the word sougi, Japanese for funeral; Description of how the site aids those mourning the dead as well as the deceased's family; Popularity of the site.

  • Honoring the E-Dead. Theil, Kay // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);04/09/2001 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 137 Issue 15, p52 

    Discusses the creation of the Japanese Web site esougi.com, which helps mourners deal with the logistics of funerals. Inspiration from the word sougi, Japanese for funeral; Description of how the site aids those mourning the dead as well as the deceased's family; Popularity of the site.

  • GRAVE RESPONSIBILITIES. Lynch, Thomas // U.S. Catholic;Jul2003, Vol. 68 Issue 7, p18 

    Presents an article about pre-planning one's funeral. Options to choose from with regard to pre-planned funeral service; Comments against pre-planned funeral services; Role of the family in the provision of funeral services to loved ones.

  • Something for the coffin. Wells, Samuel // Christian Century;9/18/2013, Vol. 130 Issue 19, p35 

    The article presents a personal narrative describing how the author, a priest in the Church of England, witnessed a mother leaving an object in the casket of her dead son at the funeral as part of her grieving and reflecting on its significance.

  • Winning Friends and Influencing Dead People. STRICKLAND, J. L. // Southern Cultures;Summer2014, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p100 

    A personal narrative is presented which describes the author's experience of keeping vigil over the corpse of an older relative.

  • A Joyful Funeral. Englebert, Victor // World & I;May2000, Vol. 15 Issue 5, p198 

    Details how funeral rites are observed in Ghana, Africa. Prices of coffins; Funeral proceedings; Differences between Ghanaians' funeral rites with that of Western countries.

  • LAS PRÁCTICAS MORTUORIAS EN EL HUMEDAL DEL PARANÁ INFERIOR. Mazza, Bárbara; Loponte, Daniel // Arqueología Iberoamericana;mar2012, Issue 13, p3 

    In this paper we present a synthesis of mortuary practices of aboriginal groups who inhabited the final stretch of the La Plata basin during the late Holocene. This record has been analyzed with regard to two central aspects: general tendencies of burial behaviors and their variability related...

  • WWD FRIDAY. Goize, Francois // WWD: Women's Wear Daily;6/6/2008, Vol. 195 Issue 120, p1 

    A photograph of the mourners outside the Saint-Roch church in Paris, France, at the funeral of Yves Saint Laurent is presented.

  • Behind the Green Burial Movement. Sehee, Joe // Green Funeral Service Desk Reference;2009, p93 

    Chapter 19 of the book "The Green Funeral Service Desk Reference" is presented. It offers the author's insights on the environment-friendly, end-of-life rituals or green cemetery. The author cites his concern about the environment and costs as the primary reasons why such kind of burial is...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics