TITLE

Minding Nature: Val Plumwood's Critique of Moral Extensionism

AUTHOR(S)
Diehm, Christian
PUB. DATE
March 2010
SOURCE
Environmental Ethics;Spring2010, Vol. 32 Issue 1, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
It has been claimed that Val Plumwood's work is vulnerable to the same charge of "assimilationism" that she has leveled against moral extensionist viewpoints. It is argued that while one might regard Plumwood's position as suspect because of its emphasis on human-nature continuity, associating claims of continuity with assimilationism could lead one to seek a mode of relating to nature as absolutely other, a move which is claimed to be problematic for several reasons. Because the extensionist error is not simply that of acknowledging human-nature continuity, Plumwood's position is not extensionist in any objectionable sense. This issue is connected up with the ongoing debate about "perspectival anthropocentrism" in environmental ethics; however, allowing for human epistemic locatedness does not force the conclusion that all environmental ethics is ultimately assimilationist.
ACCESSION #
49312922

 

Related Articles

  • Being toward meat: anthropocentrism, indistinction, and veganism. Calarco, Matthew // Dialectical Anthropology;Dec2014, Vol. 38 Issue 4, p415 

    Much of the recent work that has been done in critical animal/animality studies revolves around the challenge of thinking about animals in other-than-anthropocentric terms. The difficulties associated with this task are varied and formidable, inasmuch as anthropocentrism, while not fully...

  • Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason (Book). Carter, Alan // Environmental Ethics;Fall2004, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p323 

    Reviews the book "Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason," by Val Plumwood.

  • Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason (Book). Scholz, Sally J.; Lintott, Sheila // APA Newsletters;Spring2004, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p129 

    Reviews the book "Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason," by Val Plumwood.

  • OPEN CONTINUITY. Kretz, Lisa // Ethics & the Environment;Fall2009, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p115 

    In this paper I explore some of the ramifications that thinking ecologically has on thinking about the human self, identity, and ethics. Inspired and informed by the work of the late Val Plumwood, I recommend new directions for Plumwood's application of ecological continuity to human...

  • Val Plumwood.  // Chain Reaction;Sep2008, Issue 103, p2 

    The article presents an obituary for Val Plumwood, a writer and environmental activist.

  • IN HONOR OF VAL PLUMWOOD, 1939-2008. Davion, Victoria // Ethics & the Environment;Fall2009, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p1 

    A obituary for Val Plumwood, an environmentalist, a philosopher and an ecologist, is presented.

  • INCORPORATING THE OTHER. Eaton, David // Ethics & the Environment;Autumn2002, Vol. 7 Issue 2, p153 

    Val Plumwood's recent attempt to formulate a "contextual" theory of vegetarianism that integrates concern for animals, ecology, and unprivileged societies involves heavy criticism of Carol J. Adams. Plumwood's theory, although claiming to be "contextual," involves an unnecessary degree of...

  • An African Relational Environmentalism and Moral Considerability. Behrens, Kevin Gary // Environmental Ethics;Spring2014, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p63 

    There is a pervasive presumption that African thought is inherently anthropocentric and has little to contribute to environmental ethics. Against this view, a promising African environmentalism can be be found in a belief in a fundamental interrelatedness between natural objects. What...

  • COMPANIONSHIP WITH NATURE IN ASIAN TRADITIONS: A RESOURCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION. HOSSAIN TALUKDER, MD. MUNIR // Agathos: An International Review of the Humanities & Social Scie;2014, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p124 

    What is the meaning of 'nature' in Asian cultures? How do Asian people perceive their relations to nature? What types of environmental ethics do Asian cultures exhibit? This paper considers these questions in two major Asian traditions, Indian and Chinese. It points out that the concept of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics