TITLE

Big Banks Vow Appeals In Fed Loan Data Lawsuit

PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
American Banker;4/15/2010, Vol. 175 Issue 58, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that several of the biggest U.S. commercial banks will appeal the disclosure of U.S. Federal Reserve lending in the year 2008. It is suggested that continued legal appeals will delay or prevent the first look at details of the central banks' emergency lending during the 2008 financial crisis. The lawsuit was brought by Bloomberg Limited Partnership seeking a release of records to four of the Federal Reserve's lending programs.
ACCESSION #
49247909

 

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