TITLE

Why FDIC Loss Shares Now End at 'Tail Risk'

AUTHOR(S)
Garver, Rob
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
American Banker;4/14/2010, Vol. 175 Issue 57, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the purchasing of failed banks' assets from the U.S. Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC). The FDIC has been retaining much of the risk associated with the assets it is selling, but it has begun to lessen the extent to which it is willing to insure investors' exposure to losses.
ACCESSION #
49155534

 

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