TITLE

An Update on Phytophthora ramorum, Causal Agent of Sudden Oak Death

AUTHOR(S)
Swain, Steve
PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
International Oaks;Summer2002, Issue 13, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on Phytophthora (P.) ramorum, a causal agent of Sudden Oak Death occurring in California. Several reproductive structures are being produced by P. ramorum including sporangia, zoospores, and chlamydospores. The importance of water to the ability of P. ramorum to reproduce is mentioned. The potential elimination of tanoak as a significant element of west coast forests is cited as the possible greatest long-term threat posed by the disease.
ACCESSION #
49139875

 

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