TITLE

Oaks and Oak Hybrids at Arboretum Trompenburg

AUTHOR(S)
Van Hoey Smith, J. R. P.
PUB. DATE
December 1999
SOURCE
International Oaks;Dec1999, Issue 9, p151
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the collection of oaks in the Arboretum Trompenburg in Rotterdam, Holland. Originating from 1925, the collection was built after the Dutch elm disease cleared the area. The author assumed the management of the arboretum after the Second World War whose oak assortment has expanded to more than 250 taxa including 100 species and 140 cultivars and hybrids. The oaks at the arboretum includes Quercus acuta, Q. alnifolia, Q. xbrittonii, Q. castaneifolia, Q. coccifera, Q. dentata and Q. frainetto.
ACCESSION #
49120397

 

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