TITLE

Lunch is Served

AUTHOR(S)
Paul, Reid
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
Pharmaceutical Representative;Apr2010, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on sales representatives (reps), healthcare professionals (HCPs) and gift-giving in the U.S. It says that the Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufacturers Association (PhRMA) Code on Interactions with HCPs states that meals must not be the focus during in-office or in-hospital educational presentations of sales reps. It mentions that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) condemns the action of several of pharmaceutical companies offering gifts and food to boost sales.
ACCESSION #
49090429

 

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