TITLE

(SUBSTANCE ABUSE) Study: Kids Use Inhalants More than Drugs

PUB. DATE
March 2010
SOURCE
Community Health Funding Week;3/12/2010, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that data released by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has revealed that 12-year-olds have used common household products as inhalants to get high than have used marijuana, cocaine and hallucinogens combined. Common consumer goods that contain such components include spray paints, household adhesives, typewriter correction fluids, felt-tip markers, vegetable cooking sprays and even whipped cream in aerosol cans.
ACCESSION #
49035127

 

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