TITLE

Black Lawmakers in Congress

PUB. DATE
February 1971
SOURCE
Ebony;Feb1971, Vol. 26 Issue 4, p115
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on several African American legislators including Edward W. Brooke, William L. Dawson and Adom Clayton Powell. It reports that these legislators were standing against white opponents and won the House seats of U.S. In political history, national black legislators had gathered for the house seats.
ACCESSION #
48953847

 

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