TITLE

Open Access / Open Grad Students

AUTHOR(S)
Harrison, Laurie
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Proceedings of the International Conference on e-Learning;2009, p191
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Support for Open Access (OA) as an accepted model for scholarly publishing is changing the academic landscape for today's graduate students. The Open Access movement has the potential to impact many facets of the graduate experience. This may include participation in peer-reviewed publishing initiatives, learning to become members of the community of researchers and producers of scholarly works, and finally, involvement in the Open Education Resource (OER) movement. Graduate student participation in student peer-reviewed journals is increasing as tomorrow's scholars seek both the experience of the publishing process first hand, as well as the opportunity to get a professional "foot in the door". Current OA journals using efficient Open Journal System (OJS) tools and work flows provide a low-cost, inclusive point of access and play an important role in introducing the critical peer review process to future faculty and researchers. When we are educating graduate students, acquiring confidence in the practice of scholarly research, writing and review is as important as the discipline-specific expertise. Many of our students may find OA publishing of their thesis to be an important step in their induction into the academy. At the University of Toronto the eThesis initiative requires that all graduate students contribute their thesis or dissertation to the institutional repository where it may be immediately accessed to scholars in their field and prioritized by primary scholarly search engines. The policy and practice related to OA publishing observed within the university environment will inform their understanding of cultural norms. This eThesis program provides an early exposure to Open Access publishing practice. Finally, as global citizens, our students value the opportunity to share their work beyond the borders of the relatively wealthy western world institutions of higher education, and also to access resources beyond the subscription limitations of their own place of study. New patterns of practice rooted in a new culture of social networking are emerging for the graduate student community.
ACCESSION #
48947210

 

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics