TITLE

Relation of Executive Functioning to Pragmatic Outcome Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

AUTHOR(S)
Douglas, Jacinta M.
PUB. DATE
April 2010
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Apr2010, Vol. 53 Issue 2, p365
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Purpose: This study was designed to explore the behavioral nature of pragmatic impairment following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to evaluate the contribution of executive skills to the experience of pragmatic difficulties after TBI. Method: Participants were grouped into 43 TBI dyads (TBI adults and close relatives) and 43 control dyads. All TBI participants had sustained severe injury (mean posttraumatic amnesia duration = 45.19 days, SD = 39.15) due to a moving vehicle-related trauma. A minimum of 2 years had elapsed since injury (M = 5.36 years, SD = 3.61). The La Trobe Communication Questionnaire (LCQ; Douglas, O'Flaherty, & Snow, 2000) was administered to all participants. Measures of executive function included the following: the FAS verbal fluency task (Spreen & Benton, 1969), the Speed and Capacity of Language Processing test (Baddeley, Emslie, & Nimmo-Smith, 1992), and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task (Rey, 1964). Results: Perceptions of TBI participants and their relatives were significantly correlated (r = .63, p < .001) and significantly different from those of controls, F(1, 84) = 37.2, p < .001. Pragmatic difficulties represented violations in 3 domains of Grice's (1975) Cooperative Principle (Quantity, Relation, and Manner), and executive function measures predicted 37% (32% adjusted) of the variability in LCQ scores. Conclusions: The study demonstrates evidence of a significant association between executive impairment and the pragmatic communication difficulties experienced by individuals with TBI.
ACCESSION #
48917363

 

Related Articles

  • Fundamentos teóricos y estrategias de intervención en la rehabilitación neuropsicológica en adultos con daño cerebral adquirido. Carvajal-Castrillón, Julián; Restrepo Pelaez, Adelaida // Revista CES Psicologia;jul-dic2013, Vol. 6 Issue 2, p135 

    Neuropsychological rehabilitation is an area of applied neuropsychology that intervenes over altered cognitive processes, allowing a higher level of information processing and functional adaptation of the patient with acquired brain disfunction. The present article describes some observations of...

  • C-85 Effect of “Diagnosis Threat” in Clinical Setting. Fresson, M; Dardenne, B; Meulemans, T // Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology;Sep2014, Vol. 29 Issue 6, p604 

    Objective: When reminded of their neurological history, mild traumatic brain injured (TBI) students underperform on neuropsychological tests. To date, this “diagnosis threat” (DT) phenomenon has mainly been studied with a non-clinical and high-functioning population (university...

  • TBI: The Stealthy School Stressor. CICCIA, ANGELA // ASHA Leader;Dec2015, Vol. 20 Issue 12, p36 

    The article discusses how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can help identify and procure services for students suffering from the effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Topics mentioned include why TBI after-effects last longer in children, a movement that was started to consider TBI a...

  • 027 Rehabilitation for dysexecutive symptoms.  // Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry;Oct2010, Vol. 81 Issue 10, pe11 

    ABSTRACT: Disorders of executive functioning associated with frontal lobe damage have long been recognised as causing significant disability in people with brain injury and other neurological and psychiatric conditions. While the last half-century has seen significant advances in modelling the...

  • Cooking breakfast after a brain injury. Tanguay, Annick N.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Nuñez, Karla V. Guerrero; Ferland, Mark B. // Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience;Sep2014, Vol. 8, p1 

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in...

  • Cooking breakfast after a brain injury. Tanguay, Annick N.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Guerrero Nuñez, K. Vanessa; Ferland, Mark B. // Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience;Jul2014, Vol. 8, preceding p1 

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients' difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in...

  • Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Attention, Memory, and Language Disorders. Bigler, Erin D. // Journal of Learning Disabilities;Jun/Jul1988, Vol. 21 Issue 6, p325 

    Provides an overview of the special series on acquired cerebral trauma published in the 1988 issue of the 'Journal of Learning Disabilities.' Aspects of disorders of attention and treatment options; Treatment methods for the improvement of memory status in individuals with acquired cerebral...

  • The effects of mild and severe traumatic brain injury on the auditory and visual versions of the Adjusting-Paced Serial Addition Test (Adjusting-PSAT). Tombaugh, Tom N.; Stormer, Peter; Rees, Laura; Irving, Susan; Francis, Margaret // Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology;Oct2006, Vol. 21 Issue 7, p753 

    Abstract: Auditory and visual versions of the Adjusting-PSAT [Tombaugh, T. N. (1999). Administrative manual for the adjusting-paced serial addition test (Adjusting-PSAT). Ottawa, Ontario: Carleton University] were used to examine the effects of mild and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) on...

  • Criterion Validity of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery after Traumatic Brain Injury. Donders, Jacobus; Levitt, Terry // Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology;Jun2012, Vol. 27 Issue 4, p440 

    The performance of 54 patients with complicated mild–severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) was evaluated on the Attention, Executive Functions, and Memory modules of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB) and compared with that of 54 demographically matched healthy controls. All...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics