TITLE

THE CALCULUS OF DISSENT: A STUDY OF APPELLATE DIVISION

AUTHOR(S)
La Valley III, Joseph C.
PUB. DATE
June 2001
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2001, Vol. 64 Issue 4, p1405
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines New York Appellate Division justices' dissenting opinions on constitutional issues. Analysis on the Appellate Division criminal caseloads from 1990 to 2000; Steps that describe the research plan used to obtain the data for identifying individual justices' voting patterns; Conclusions.
ACCESSION #
4888208

 

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