TITLE

TAMMANY GUNS FOR POWELL BUT HE'S STILL HARLEM POWER

PUB. DATE
May 1946
SOURCE
Ebony;May1946, Vol. 1 Issue 7, p36
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses issues to be faced by Harlem, New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. in 1946. Powell and his wife Hazel are expecting a baby within a few months. There are rumors on the plan of Democratic organization Tammany Hall to get rid of him as congressman of Harlem. Powell is still entrenched with the Harlem electorate although he has made many enemies during his term of office.
ACCESSION #
48649904

 

Related Articles

  • Back in the Fold.  // Time;10/20/1958, Vol. 72 Issue 16, p24 

    The article focuses on the decision of Tammany Hall chieftain Carmine De Sapio to invite back Negro Congressman Adam Clayton Powell to the Tammany with the special title of associate manager of Governor Averell Harriman's re-election campaign.

  • What's in our hands? Maddox Jr. // New York Amsterdam News;12/16/99, Vol. 90 Issue 51, p13 

    Comments on `Ebony' magazine's publishing of a list of `100 Most Important Blacks in the World in the 20th Century' in its December 1999 issue. Definition of important personality; Revisionist position concerning the place of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. in history; Achievements of Powell.

  • John Conyers of Detroit: Successor to Adam Powell? Friedman, Saul // New Republic;2/4/67, Vol. 156 Issue 5, p12 

    Profiles John Conyers Jr., an African American congressman from Detroit, Michigan. Possibility of him succeeding Adam Clayton Powell as representative of African Americans to the U.S. House; Comparison of Conyers to other African Americans in the House; Political background; Achievements as a...

  • Build on the Legacy of Adam Clayton Powell. Jones, David R. // New York Amsterdam News;12/11/2008, Vol. 99 Issue 51, p5 

    The author reflects on the legacy of Adam Clayton Powell, the first African American congressman from New York. The conditions in Harlem spurred Powell to use his power in Congress to move the federal government to help the poor. Powell orchestrated the passage of Lyndon Johnson's "Great...

  • The Racial Identity of Adam Clayton Powell Jr.: A Case Study in Racial Ambivalence and Redefinition. Rushing, Lawrence // Afro-Americans in New York Life & History;Jan2010, Vol. 34 Issue 1, p7 

    The article presents a case study on the racial identity of African American leader Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. The author reflects on his election to the U.S. Congress from New York City and the struggle for civil rights. Emphasis is given to his family background, the experience of discrimination...

  • Black Lawmakers in Congress.  // Ebony;Feb1971, Vol. 26 Issue 4, p115 

    The article offers information on several African American legislators including Edward W. Brooke, William L. Dawson and Adom Clayton Powell. It reports that these legislators were standing against white opponents and won the House seats of U.S. In political history, national black legislators...

  • ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR. STONE, LES // Black Heroes;2001, p544 

    An encyclopedia entry for Adam Clayton Powell Jr. is presented. The African-American clergyman and civil rights activist was elected to the U.S. Congress, where he developed a reputation as an outspoken antagonist of racist activities. His support for Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower...

  • `I remember Adam.' Garland, P. // Ebony;Mar1990, Vol. 45 Issue 5, p56 

    Recounts the life and political career of Harlem's first black Congressman, the late Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Public Broadcasting System's documentary `Adam Clayton Powell Jr'; Powell's impact on Harlem; Civil rights activism; Various marriages; Fall from grace.

  • Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Chapelle, T. // Black Collegian;Jan/Feb92, Vol. 22 Issue 3, p65 

    Considers the cultural and political legacy of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Overview of his college career; Perfection of his role as an agitator; His famous legislative weapon entitled the `Powell Amendment'; His personal excesses; How he used up his political currency.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics