TITLE

POWER, MOBILITY AND THE LAW OF THE SEA

AUTHOR(S)
Richardson, Elliot L.
PUB. DATE
March 1980
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Spring80, Vol. 58 Issue 4, p902
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explains the implications of the Law of the Sea on the mobility of the United States Navy throughout the world. In 1945, the U.S. President Harry S. Truman unwittingly proclaimed the jurisdiction of the United States over the seabed resources of the continental shelf. Though scarcely comparable to the attempt by Spain and Portugal in 1494 to divide all the world's oceans between themselves in accordance with precepts enunciated by Pope Alexander VI, the Truman Proclamation constituted the first major breach in modern times of the classic principles of ocean law laid down by Hugo Grotius in 1609. Three years later Chile and Peru, followed by Ecuador, outdid President Truman by claiming maritime zones extending 200 miles from their coasts and embracing the water column as well as the seabed. It was beginning to be clear a decade later that the only way of reconciling the number and variety of claims that had by then emerged would be through the convening of a new international conference charged with drawing up a comprehensive charter for all uses of the oceans. When the first substantive session of the Law of the Sea Conference got underway in 1974, 76 countries had claimed territorial seas ranging from 12 miles to 200 miles, and since then the number has increased to 101.
ACCESSION #
4854079

 

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