TITLE

LABOR AND THE MULTINATIONALS

AUTHOR(S)
Cox, Robert W.
PUB. DATE
January 1976
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1976, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p344
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article analyzes the total impact of multinational corporations (MNC) of Western industrialized countries on organized labor and the total social structure and work force patterns of other nations. The question of labor and the MNC has often been discussed as though the working people concerned were just the employees of MNC. This is far too restricted a perspective within which to evaluate the social consequences of MNC expansion. In the broader context required to assess social impact, the expansion of MNC must be seen as a principal dynamic factor in a far-reaching transformation of the world economy which is affecting the whole world labor force.The advocates of the MNC often describe it as an engine of development. What they usually mean by this is that MNC can increase growth, measured in production and incomes. In aggregate terms, this is a defensible proposition, but it begs the question: what is development? Whatever precise meanings may be assigned to it, development is a normative and purposive concept, and can never properly be reduced to an accounting aggregate like Gross National Product.
ACCESSION #
4853303

 

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