TITLE

CONTROLLING THE DEFENSE BUDGET

AUTHOR(S)
Blechman, Barry M.; Fried, Edward R.
PUB. DATE
January 1976
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1976, Vol. 54 Issue 2, p233
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the need of the U.S. administration to reverse what it described as a ten-year trend of declining military capabilities relative to those of the Soviet Union, in light of President Gerald Ford's presentation of the 1976 defense budget. As a consequence, the President requested an appropriation of 105 billion dollars for the Department of Defense, an increase of 15 percent over the previous year. About half of this increase was simply to offset the effect of inflation. The other half, however, was to fund the first-year costs of a continuing program to increase the size of conventional forces and to expand nuclear capabilities at a fairly rapid rate. After an extensive review of the defense budget, the Congress in November 1975 reduced the request by approximately 7.5 billion dollars on an annual basis, or in other words roughly the amount necessary to keep defense expenditures constant in real terms, that is, adjusted for inflation. The 1976 defense budget continued in the same tradition. The Ford Administration responded to the defense dilemma by grappling with the problem of rising unit costs as best it could without making any fundamental changes in military policies and objectives.
ACCESSION #
4853275

 

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