TITLE

THE PLOUGHSHARES WAR BETWEEN EUROPE AND AMERICA

AUTHOR(S)
Butler, Nicholas
PUB. DATE
September 1983
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Fall1983, Vol. 62 Issue 1, p105
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines the origins and reasons behind the current agricultural trade dispute between the U.S. and Europe, as of September 1983. In the early rounds of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) negotiations in the late 1940s and early 1950s, agriculture was not a central issue. Only 15 percent of international grain production was traded in 1950. The individual countries which were to become the member states of the European community pursued generally protectionist policies, but limited technology left them with a significant import requirement--sufficient to satisfy the export capabilities of North American wheat and corn producers. In the U.S., less than 20 percent of grain production went for export, exports were always important but had little of the crucial significance they have acquired over the last two decades. It can be argued that by the early 1970s the U.S. had adjusted to the Common Agricultural Policy. The U.S. had begun to find new and highly lucrative markets in the community. In trade matters Europe and the U.S. are already beginning to look less like partners and more like adversaries. Disputes over the last few years have had a corrosive effect on the trust which should form the basis of the Alliance. Further disputes, whether conducted through rhetoric, selective statistics, or open measures of economic warfare will do nothing to repair the damage.
ACCESSION #
4853108

 

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