TITLE

U.S.-SAUDI RELATIONS AND THE OIL CRISIS OF THE 1980s

AUTHOR(S)
Rustow, Dankwart A.
PUB. DATE
January 1977
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1977, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p494
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article analyzes the possible directions in U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations based on projections of crude oil crises in the 1980s. It is expected that in the next five to ten years, the demand for crude oil by industrial countries from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) will catch up with the amounts that OPEC countries will be able or willing to make available for export. Saudi Arabia, an OPEC member, is the leading producer and exporter of crude oil, while the U.S. has been the leading importer of crude oil. From these facts, one can readily appreaciate the importance of crude oil crises to the dynamics of U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations. It can be readily understood, based on the experience of the previous crude oil crises, that whether U.S.-Saudi Arabia relations in the future will turn toward cooperation or confrontation will depend in part on the evolution of the Arab-Israel conflict.
ACCESSION #
4853083

 

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