TITLE

POPULATION GROWTH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: THE CASE OF MEXICO

AUTHOR(S)
Coale, Ansley J.
PUB. DATE
January 1978
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1978, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p415
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the link between economic development and population growth in Mexico. The debate about population and development persists in about the same terms as 20 years ago. The argument, common at the time, between optimists and pessimists on the role of population in development has, if anything, sharpened. The pessimists are found among environmentalists, biological scientists, and supporters of the Planned Parenthood movement, groups that have been more vocal in the past 20 years. The pessimistic view has been expressed in books with alarmist titles, such as The Population Bomb, and Famine 1975! The latter book, in addition to forecasting the inevitability of famine by 1975, proposed that the less-developed countries in the world be put in categories sometimes used by medical personnel at battle stations when casualties are very severe. This doctrine (triage) divides the casualties into those so seriously wounded that the overtaxed medical facilities have little chance of saving them, those lightly enough wounded that their lives will not be endangered if they are not given immediate attention, and a third category of those at neither extreme on whom the limited immediate medical care is concentrated. The authors suggest by analogy that there are countries in which the population situation is so desperate that efforts to help are useless.
ACCESSION #
4852582

 

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