TITLE

SOUTH AFRICA: WHAT IS TO BE DONE

AUTHOR(S)
Ferguson, Clyde; Cotter, William R.
PUB. DATE
January 1978
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1978, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p253
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the decision of the South African government to continue a policy of total repression on political issues which marks the end of its international relations with the U.S. By the 1970s, as repression grew ever more harsh and international condemnation ever more intense, a new black movement emerged--first among the black university students and then among urban blacks--taking as its leitmotif the raising of black consciousness. The values of black pride and self-reliance were stressed, adding a new dimension to previous politicization of blacks. It is significant that the rigid structure of separation and repression was solidified during years in which South Africa was comparatively free of external pressures. Following the Sharpeville massacre in 1960 and until the end of the Portuguese empire in 1974 to 1975, South Africa enjoyed unprecedented growth, as Western capital flowed in; seeming internal stability with virtually no visible black resistance; and relative protection from international harassment. International efforts to affect South Africa's internal situation--and international concern with the distribution of power within that country--do not, of course, originate with the administration of U.S. President James Carter. Beginning almost literally with the birth of the United Nations, the racial policies and practices of South Africa have engaged the attention of the international community.
ACCESSION #
4851961

 

Related Articles

  • SOUTH AFRICA: WHAT IS TO BE DONE. Ferguson, Clyde; Cotter, William R. // Foreign Affairs;Jan1978, Vol. 56 Issue 2, p253 

    The article discusses the decision of the South African government to continue a policy of total repression on political issues which marks the end of its international relations with the U.S. By the 1970s, as repression grew ever more harsh and international condemnation ever more intense, a...

  • Crowds commemorate Sharpeville Massacre.  // New York Amsterdam News;3/28/2002, Vol. 93 Issue 13, p2 

    Focuses on the commemoration of Sharpeville Massacre in South Africa. Participation of President Nelson Nadela in the event; Memoirs of massacre survivor Johannes Sefatsa; Details of the message of survivor Sello Matlhare recollecting the incidence.

  • Reagan and South Africa: The Case for Urgent Understanding. Hutchinson, John // National Review;11/1/1985, Vol. 37 Issue 21, p25 

    Focuses on U.S. President Ronald Reagan's foreign policy towards South Africa. Ethnological background, economy, politics and history of atrocities committed by the white population on blacks; Imposition of economic sanctions on the South African government; Issues regarding the government's...

  • U.S.-SOUTH AFRICAN RELATIONS.  // Background Notes on Countries of the World: South Africa;Oct2006, p9 

    The article describes the relationship between the U.S. and South Africa. Since 1799, the U.S. has maintained an official presence in South Africa. Americans and South Africans have a number of nongovernmental ties, such as the activities of American missionaries in South Africa. Principal U.S....

  • A View of Rome from the Provinces. Sparks, Allister // Wilson Quarterly;Spring2001, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p46 

    Focuses on the relationship between South Africa and the United States (U.S.). Factors which led to the hostility of South Africa toward the U.S.; Efforts made by U.S. President Bill Clinton to bridge the gap between the countries; Issues on the U.S. opposition to the emerging framework of...

  • Apathy and Accountability: South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Rose, Jacquelene // Raritan;Spring2002, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p175 

    Focuses on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa. Concept of apathy; Issue of accountability in South Africa; Discussion of the 1960 Sharpeville massacre and other killings in South Africa.

  • "They stole us....they owe us! Reparations now!". Boyd, Herb // New York Amsterdam News;4/2/2009, Vol. 100 Issue 14, p40 

    The article reports on the demand for reparation by victims of crimes against humanity in the U.S. The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination and the 49th anniversary of the Sharpeville massacre is considered by demonstrators to demand for compensation and attack the...

  • SOUTH AFRICA: The Handwriting On The Wall.  // Ebony;Jul1960, Vol. 15 Issue 9, p27 

    The article reports on the protests for the Sharpeville massacre and the apartheid policy in 1960 in South Africa. It mentions that 30,000 African American lead by a 21-year old student Philip Kgosana protested in front of the police station in Cape Town against the apartheid policy in the...

  • Sharpeville: A Massacre and its Consequences.  // Publishers Weekly;4/4/2011, Vol. 258 Issue 14, p40 

    The article reviews the book "Sharpeville: A Massacre and Its Consequences," by Tom Lodge.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics