TITLE

Lower seeding rates may save money with transgenic cottonseed

AUTHOR(S)
Smith, Ron
PUB. DATE
February 2010
SOURCE
Southwest Farm Press;2/4/2010, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the ideal cotton seeding rate per foot of row to achieve higher return on investments in the U.S.
ACCESSION #
48143712

 

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