TITLE

Acreage projections - How reliable are they?

AUTHOR(S)
Robinson, Elton
PUB. DATE
February 2010
SOURCE
Southwest Farm Press;2/4/2010, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article forecasts that there will be an 11 percent increase of cotton acreage in the year 2010 because of decreasing corn prices and increasing cotton prices in the U.S.
ACCESSION #
48143710

 

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