TITLE

How do consumers perceive the reliability of online shops?

AUTHOR(S)
Hanai, Tomomi; Oguchi, Takashi
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Cyberpsychology;2009, Vol. 3 Issue 2, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate what kind of information contributes to trust formation in online shopping. Twenty-seven female undergraduate students were recruited and asked to evaluate the trustworthiness of 20 online shopping websites. Aft the online shopping websites dealt with branded products where there is greater emphasis on the trustworthiness of online shops or products. The results show that information described on the websites was classified into two categories, firstly, information about the shop and its procedures and services. Secondly, the concrete information necessary for the consumption process, such as payment information and return information, which heightens the reliability of these shops.
ACCESSION #
47965242

 

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