TITLE

Still Out There

AUTHOR(S)
Wolfe, Daniel
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
American Banker;1/20/2010, Vol. 175 Issue 10, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the Conficker worm, a computer virus which gained control of millions of computers in 2009. A report by Akamai Technologies Inc. stated that the worm remains present in many computers, despite a computer software patch offered by Microsoft Inc. for its Windows operating programs. Computers which use unlicensed versions of Windows remain vulnerable.
ACCESSION #
47665967

 

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