TITLE

Are Our Differences Truly Questions of Fact?

AUTHOR(S)
Senf, Gerald M.
PUB. DATE
December 1977
SOURCE
Journal of Learning Disabilities;Dec1977, Vol. 10 Issue 10
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the debate concerning the reading process. Correct approach of analyzing reading; Controversy over word-versus-phonics approach; Reading skills of learning-disabled children; Politico-economic reality of learning disability.
ACCESSION #
4730052

 

Related Articles

  • Assessing Letter Sound Knowledge: A Comparison of Letter Sound Fluency and Nonsense Word Fluency. Ritchey, Kristen D. // Exceptional Children;Summer2008, Vol. 74 Issue 4, p487 

    This article compares 2 fluency-based assessments of letter sound knowledge: letter sound fluency and nonsense word fluency (NWF). Ninety-one children were administered both assessments 5 times during the second half of kindergarten. The assessments were comparable for concurrent and predictive...

  • Reading Strategies for Students With Mild Disabilities. BOYLE, JOSEPH R. // Intervention in School & Clinic;Sep2008, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p3 

    Teaching children with mild disabilities to read can be a challenging task for even the most seasoned teacher. In order to be successful, teachers need to be knowledgeable about the big five of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension (National Reading Panel,...

  • Effectiveness of phonics for students with learning disabilities. Hooks, Linda; Peach, Walter // Journal of Instructional Psychology;Sep93, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p243 

    Examines the effectiveness of the Char-L Intensive Phonics Program with a group of students diagnosed as learning disabled. Provision of framework for word attack skills by phonics instruction; Use of Char-L to improve reading skills; Discussion of methodology; Implication of pretests and...

  • A Comparison of the Phonic Decoding Ability of Normal and Learning Disabled Children. Kochnower, Jeffrey; Richardson, Ellis; DiBenedetto, Barbara // Journal of Learning Disabilities;Jun/Jul1983, Vol. 16 Issue 6 

    Compares the phonic decoding ability of normal and learning disabled children. Total correct responses on the real and nonsense word section and the immediate recognition responses; Specific deficiency of children who have difficulty in learning how to read using the phonetic code; Reading...

  • The relative effects of word-analysis and word-supply correction procedures with poor readers during word-attack training. Meyer, Linda A. // Reading Research Quarterly;1982, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p544 

    TWO PROCEDURES for correcting oral reading errors during training in word-attack strategies in a naturalistic setting were examined. Fifty-eight middle school students served as subjects in the experiment; the students had been identified as either learning disabled or educationally handicapped....

  • Phonemic processing and the poor reader from a developmental lag viewpoint. Beech, John R.; Harding, Leonora M. // Reading Research Quarterly;Spring1984, Vol. 19 Issue 3, p357 

    THIS EXPERIMENT investigated whether there was a developmental lag in skills associated with phonemic processing in poor readers of normal nonverbal intelligence. Fifty-seven poor readers, 44 younger readers of the same reading level, and 35 normal readers of the same age as the poor readers...

  • Deprogramming Reading Failure: Giving Unequal Learners An Equal Chance. Carbo, Marie // Phi Delta Kappan;Nov87, Vol. 69 Issue 3, p197 

    Reveals that there is not one right way to teach all children to read. Classification as learning disabled children with a different reading style; Inadequacies of phonics- or linguistics-based instructional materials; Matching instructional methods to students' reading styles.

  • Multisensory Programs in the Public Schools: A Brighter Future for LD Children. Ogden, Sherry; Hindman, Suzanne; Turner, Susan Douglas // Annals of Dyslexia;1989, Vol. 39, p247 

    A longitudinal study followed the progress of a group of elementary SLD students as they were instructed using the Alphabetic Phonics (AP) curriculum. After a three year period, the AP curriculum produced positive results in reading comprehension for most SLD students, particularly those who...

  • programs, materials, and techniques. Brown, Virginia L. // Journal of Learning Disabilities;Apr1976, Vol. 9 Issue 4 

    Evaluates the Sipay Word Analysis Tests (SWAT), an individually administered series of phonic-related tests designed to reinforce the basis for the development of remedial programs in the field of learning disabilities. Peabody Articulation Decks; Planning Curriculum Development; Teaching...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics