TITLE

Bury Our Carbon at Sea

AUTHOR(S)
Upbin, Bruce
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;11/30/2009, Vol. 5 Issue 18, p62
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on an innovative business model that is to capture and sequester carbon dioxide beneath the earth's surface, which would be discussed at the climatic change summit to be held in Copenhagen, Denmark. It is stated that summit would also focus on what to do with the 30 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide produced by the human race every year by burning fossil fuels.
ACCESSION #
47241134

 

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