TITLE

Teaching Health Law

AUTHOR(S)
Singer, Lawrence E.; Bess, Megan
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics;Winter2009, Vol. 37 Issue 4, p852
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on the evaluation of the curriculum by Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy at Loyola University Chicago School of Law to ensure that students are well prepared for the legal practice of health law. It notes that clearly defining the content and goals of the curriculum will help students, faculty and practicing lawyers acquire knowledge of the health law concepts and skills. It mentions the positive feedback of the respondents on the curriculum of Loyola.
ACCESSION #
46823877

 

Related Articles

  • Notre Dame expands course, clinical offerings. Newton, Nell Jessup // Indiana Lawyer;3/16/2012, Vol. 23 Issue 1, p4 

    The article focuses on the expansion of the offerings of University of Notre Dame Law School in South Bend, Indiana. Its additional interdisciplinary courses are intended to meet the challenges of preparing students law practice. Its Notre Dame Legal Aid Clinic undergoes transformation reflect...

  • Teaching Health Law. Todres, Jonathan // Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics;Summer2009, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p375 

    The author discusses the experiences, challenges, and opportunities in teaching health law in the U.S. He agrees that health law courses offer opportunities for law students to gain insights into processes and skills used in transactional law practice. He believes that exercises in health law...

  • EDITORIAL TOO LITTLE, TOO MUCH. Davis Jr., O. L. // Journal of Curriculum & Supervision;Summer2000, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p275 

    Editorial. Emphasizes the importance of curriculum content. Comments on the technical terminology of many curriculum standards; Risks of underestimating curriculum content.

  • Democratization of Curriculum Evaluation. Willis, George // Educational Leadership;May81, Vol. 38 Issue 8, p630 

    Examines the limitations of curriculum evaluation in the U.S. Tendency of evaluation specialists to prefer data over human perception; Processes of curriculum evaluation; Way of democratizing curriculum evaluation.

  • The 'Ideal' of Popular Education. Cremin, Lawrence A. // Education Week;2/28/1990, Vol. 9 Issue 23, p30 

    Excerpts from the books "Popular Education and its Discontents," by Lawrence A. Cremin and "History of the School Curriculum," by Daniel and Laurel Tanner are presented.

  • Reporting, editing courses merged into single course. Winford, George M. // Journalism Educator;Winter86, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p14 

    Reports on the efficacy of the combined course of University of Alaska called Basic Newsgathering. Reason for the existence of the reporting and editing course merged as one; Similarities of reporting and editing; Benefits of the course to students.

  • Details of consultation on the draft K--10 Australian curriculum.  // Access (10300155);Mar2010, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p20 

    The article reports that the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) has released the draft for the K-10 Australian curriculum on March 1, 2010. It states that the draft is subject for a national consultation until May 23, 2010. It adds that the draft curriculum targets...

  • MILLENNIALS, TECHNOLOGY, AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY: TRAINING A NEW GENERATION IN TECHNOLOGICAL PROFESSIONALISM. Otey, Brittany Stringfellow // Journal of the Legal Profession;Spring2013, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p199 

    This article explores the convergence of technologically-savvy Millen-nial law students, the evolving nature and expectations of legal practice, and the resulting responsibility of legal education to adequately prepare these law students to practice law in a new environment. This article will...

  • Can Law Survive Legal Education? Weinrib, Ernest J. // Vanderbilt Law Review;Mar2007, Vol. 60 Issue 2, p401 

    The article offers perspectives on legal education in the U.S. and dissents from two preceding articles by Wayne S. Hyatt and John Henry Schlegel in its premise, but agrees in its conclusion. The author notes that the aim of law school is not to serve the legal profession, but to serve the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics