TITLE

Global Measles Mortality, 2000-2008

AUTHOR(S)
Dabbagh, A.; Gacic-Dobo, M.; Simons, E.; Featherstone, D.; Strebel, P.; Okwo-Bele, J. M.; Hoekstra, E.; Chopra, M.; Uzicanin, A.; Cochi, S.
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
MMWR: Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report;12/4/2009, Vol. 58 Issue 47, p1321
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the developments in efforts of the United Nations to reduce measles mortality in children from 2000 to 2008. It enumerates the accelerated strategy identified by the World Health Organization and UNICEF for measles mortality reduction in 47 priority countries. Details on activities enacted in 2008 are explained. Also noted are global mortality projections from 2010 to 2013, and factors that influence the measles mortality burden estimates and forecasts.
ACCESSION #
46800506

 

Related Articles

  • Modeling Measles Epidemics.  // PLoS Medicine;Nov2005, Vol. 2 Issue 11, p1053 

    The article discusses research being on done measles epidemic in a highly vaccinated population. Measles is still a leading cause of death among young children, despite the availability of an effective vaccine for the past 40 years. Jacco Wallinga and colleagues stress the need for direct...

  • Weekly epidemiological record.  // Weekly Epidemiological Record;11/10/2016, Vol. 91 Issue 45, p525 

    The article presents the World Health Organization (WHO) report on the progress of worldwide measles elimination within the period 2000-2015. WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) estimated that children covered by measles-containing vaccine 1 (MCV1) and 2 increased while the...

  • INFLUENZA IN CHILDREN: PERNICIOUS, PREVENTABLE…AND STILL PREVALENT.  // Contemporary Pediatrics;Aug2006, Vol. 23 Issue 8, p42 

    The article deals with several issues concerning influenza in children. Influenza was the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in children during the 2003-2004 U.S. influenza season. During this season, more than half of children aged 6 to 23 months did not receive an influenza...

  • 100 000 children die needlessly from cancer every year. Katikireddi, Vittal // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);2/21/2004, Vol. 328 Issue 7437, p422 

    Reports on the findings of two leading cancer organizations that children in the developing world lack access to even the most basic caner treatment leading to the needless deaths of 1000,000 children each year. Call for cooperation between the World Health Organization and the World Trade...

  • Measles epidemic is feared. Defries, Melanie // Nursery World (Haymarket Business Publications Ltd);5/28/2009, Vol. 109 Issue 4171, p3 

    The article reports on the outbreaks of measles among children in England and Wales. Four children from a nursery have been treated in hospital for the disease. The concerns raised by nursery owner Sioned Saer over the possible epidemic are presented. According to acting Health Protection Agency...

  • Mayo Clinic Researchers Discover Why Measles Spreads So Quickly.  // Biomedical Market Newsletter;11/7/2011, Vol. 21, p378 

    The article focuses on the study conducted by the researchers from Mayo Clinic regarding the reasons behind the spread of measles virus. It mentions that measles virus hijack immune cells in the lungs and travels within other immune cells in the body. It notes that the virus continues to affect...

  • Progress in Global Measles Control and Mortality Reduction, 2000-2006. Dabbagh, A.; Cacic-Dobo, M.; Wolfson, L.; Featherstone, D.; Strebel, P.; Okwo-Bele, J. M.; Hoekstra, E.; Salama, P.; Wassilak, S.; Uzicanin, A. // JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association;1/30/2008, Vol. 299 Issue 4, p400 

    This article presents news from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC examines the progress in eliminating measles and death from the disease around the world during 2000-2006. The goal set by The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund...

  • Meeting measles elimination indicators: surveillance performance in a regional area of Australia. Kohlhagen, Julie K.; Massey, Peter D.; Durrheim, David N. // Western Pacific Surveillance & Response Journal;oct-dec2011, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p1 

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region has established specific measles elimination surveillance indicators. There has been concern in Australia that these indicators may be too stringent and that measles elimination can occur without all surveillance prerequisites being met,...

  • IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT MEASLES, MUMPS, AND RUBELLA AND MEASLES, MUMPS, AND RUBELLA VACCINES.  // Monkeyshines on Health & Science;Dec2002 Astronomy, p34 

    Measles is the most serious of the common childhood diseases. Usually it causes a rash, high fever, cough, runny nose, and watery eyes lasting 1 to 2 weeks. This can lead to convulsions, deafness, or mental retardation. Mumps is a common disease of children. Usually it causes fever, headache,...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics