TITLE

research record

AUTHOR(S)
Greenberg, Karen
PUB. DATE
September 1983
SOURCE
Advanced Management Journal (03621863);Fall83, Vol. 48 Issue 4, p49
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents updates on the labor supply in the United States as of September 1, 1983. Recruitment of employees; Cost of training employees; Reasons for the search of women to fill in marketing jobs.
ACCESSION #
4603480

 

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