TITLE

Wensleydale Station The epitome of trees for all reasons

AUTHOR(S)
McLean, Vivienne
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
New Zealand Tree Grower;Nov2009, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the Wensleydale Station, a farm owned by Nick and Pat Seymour in the Waiomoko catchment of Whangara, New Zealand. Poplar and willow poles were chosen for the farm's early tree planting initiatives in a bid to address soil erosion. Their vision for the property is to keep it sustainable. Wensleydale Station is composed of 600 hectares of farmed area, 170 hectares of forestry plantings and QEII reserves. Environmental issues faced by the Seymours included erosion, floods and drought.
ACCESSION #
45629885

 

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