TITLE

Evidence-Based Management: Concept Cleanup Time?

AUTHOR(S)
Briner, Rob B.; Denyer, David; Rousseau, Denise M.
PUB. DATE
November 2009
SOURCE
Academy of Management Perspectives;Nov2009, Vol. 23 Issue 4, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The term evidence-based management (EBMgt) is relatively new, though the idea of using research evidence to help make managerial decisions is not. In this paper we identify and clarify a number of common misconceptions about EBMgt. Rather than a single rigid method, EBMgt is a family of approaches that support decision making. It is something done by practitioners, not scholars, although scholars have a critical role to play in helping to provide the infrastructure required for EBMgt. Properly conducted systematic reviews that summarize in an explicit way what is known and not known about a specific practice-related question are a cornerstone of EBMgt.
ACCESSION #
45590138

 

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