TITLE

CROSS-UNDERSTANDING: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUP COGNITION AND PERFORMANCE

AUTHOR(S)
HUBER, GEORGE P.; LEWIS, KYLE
PUB. DATE
January 2010
SOURCE
Academy of Management Review;Jan2010, Vol. 35 Issue 1, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this paper we articulate the cross-understanding construct, a group-level compositional construct having as its components each group member's understanding of each other member's mental model. We describe how the cross-understanding construct explains particular inconsistencies in the groups literature, how it provides explanations for specific group outcomes and processes beyond the explanations currently in the literature, and how different levels and different distributions of cross-understanding affect group performance and learning.
ACCESSION #
45577787

 

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