TITLE

Comparison of single-reflection near-infrared and attenuated total reflection mid-infrared spectroscopies to identify and monitor hydrocarbons spilled in the marine environment

AUTHOR(S)
Pérez-Caballero, G.; Andrade, J. M.; Muniategui, S.; Prada, D.
PUB. DATE
December 2009
SOURCE
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry;Dec2009, Vol. 395 Issue 7, p2335
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The capability of single-reflection near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy to differentiate, characterize and monitor the fate of a set of hydrocarbons spilled in the marine environment was compared with that of multiple-reflection horizontal attenuated total reflection mid-IR (ATR-MIR) spectroscopy. Multivariate pattern recognition techniques [principal component analysis (PCA), multivariate polynomial regression, cluster analysis and potential curves] were applied to unravel the major trends of the weathering processes of four generic types of crude oils and two heavy fuel oils spilled under controlled conditions for almost 4 months. A chemical interpretation of the NIR spectra related the weathering processes and the PCA loadings, which had not already been done in the literature. Weathering for both light and heavy products was characterized by a contrast among the linear aliphatic structures (more volatile and easy to degrade) and the branched and aromatic structures (more recalcitrant). Potential curves were applied to model each product and determine objectively whether unknown samples could be classified correctly. Polynomial regression on the PCA scores was employed to evaluate the time elapsed from the oil spillage to its sampling; this represents a new approach to assess the age of a hydrocarbon lump. In general, NIR spectroscopy yielded good results when light crude oils were studied, whereas ATR-MIR spectroscopy led to satisfactory results for both light and heavy products.
ACCESSION #
45362964

 

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