TITLE

DIFFERENTIAL WHITE-NONWHITE MIGRATION SENSITIVITIES TO INCOME DIFFERENTIALS: AN EXPLORATORY NOTE

AUTHOR(S)
Cebula, Richard J.
PUB. DATE
March 1981
SOURCE
American Economist;Spring81, Vol. 25 Issue 1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Investigates the reasons for the differential white-nonwhite migration sensitivity to geographic income differentials in the United States. Role of the lack of empirical evidence support to welfare factor on the observed white-nonwhite disparity in the income sensitivity of migration; Sensitivity of non-whites to interregional income differentials due to their inferior economic status, compared to that of whites.
ACCESSION #
4530162

 

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