TITLE

DEVELOPMENT, MOBILITY AND SLAVERY: REAL INCOME AND SPATIAL EQUILIBRATION IN THE POSTBELLUM SOUTH

AUTHOR(S)
Graves, Philip E.; Sexton, Robert L.
PUB. DATE
March 1986
SOURCE
American Economist;Spring86, Vol. 30 Issue 1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines post-Civil War black migration in Southern United States. Reasons why blacks stayed in the South after being freed in 1862; Factors affecting large black migration after 1916; Spatial factor price equalization; Implications of the institution of slavery for income levels and mobility in the general development setting.
ACCESSION #
4524749

 

Related Articles

  • The Underground Railroad Reconsidered. Sayers, Daniel O. // Western Journal of Black Studies;Fall2004, Vol. 28 Issue 3, p435 

    Taking an anthropological and historical position, this paper explores the Underground Railroad as a long-term process of African-American defiance and marronage. Fugitives who fled to locales outside of established slavery systems in North America had political-economic impacts across agrarian...

  • Is There a "Breakdown" of the Negro Family? Herzog, Elizabeth // Social Work;Jan66, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p3 

    Recent events have reactivated controversy concerning two questions: (1) Is the low-income American Negro family showing "rapid deterioration" or continuance of low-standing patterns? (2) Are its patterns mainly rooted in the legacy of slavery? This analysis sees a long-standing picture rather...

  • Selling Out and Buying In. Clingman, James // Washington Informer;11/14/2013, Vol. 49 Issue 5, p25 

    In this article, the author reflects on the economic condition of the African American communities in the U.S. along with the information on slavery faced by communities. He focuses on the Meritorious Manumission Act of 1710 in Virginia, under which slaves were set free on the basis of their...

  • Southwestern Migration among North Carolina Planter Families: "The Disposition to Emigrate". Censer, Jane Turner // Journal of Southern History;Aug91, Vol. 57 Issue 3, p407 

    Focuses on southwestern migration among North Carolina planter families during the nineteenth century. Movement of black slavery westward, with the southern settlers; Profile of the southwestern migrant; Motives of young farmer sons who opted to establish themselves in the south away from their...

  • Dr E.E. Nelson: Founder of the Buffalo Cooperative Economic Society. Fordham, Monroe // Afro-Americans in New York Life & History;Jan2009, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p13 

    This article discusses the development of the Buffalo, New York Cooperative Economic Society by E. E. Nelson between 1928 and 1961. Nelson's upbringing and education as a physician during the first two decades of the 20th century is described. Following graduation from medical school, Nelson...

  • Gone with the Wind. Butcher, Margaret Just // New Republic;12/3/56, Vol. 135 Issue 23, p21 

    Reviews the book "The Peculiar Institution," by Kenneth M. Stampp.

  • Black Businesses - Still Left Out. Clingman, James // Washington Informer;11/11/2010, Vol. 46 Issue 54, p21 

    In this article the author discusses the exclusion of black people from participating in wealth-building opportunities in the U.S. He says that blacks strive to succeed despite the restrictions placed before them that keep them from achieving equal economic empowerment as whites. He provides...

  • Point: The Payment of Reparations for Slavery is Unworkable and Unjust. Pearson, John; Goodwin, Chuck // Points of View: Reparations for Slavery;9/30/2019, p2 

    The article presents an argument against singling out certain individuals to receive reparations at the expense of U.S. taxpayers or consumers. It claims that the practice is a combination of greed and grandstanding that is absurd in terms of logistics and damaging in terms of its betrayal of...

  • Are Blacks better off now?  // Black Enterprise;Jan1985, Vol. 15 Issue 6, p11 

    Editorial. We begin 1985 with the realization that we are facing four more years of Ronald Reagan as President. Although no one can dispute the evidence that some Americans are better off now than they were four years ago, for a fast-growing segment of the Black population, things are getting...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics