TITLE

Research topic: ethics at work

PUB. DATE
July 2009
SOURCE
People Management;7/2/2009, Vol. 15 Issue 14, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article summarizes the results of the 2nd National Survey of the British Employees' View of Ethics at Work, administered by Ipsos-MORI and the Institute of Business Ethics to 791 full-time public and private sector workers in 2009. It reveals that 25% of the respondents were aware of misconduct in their organizations, and 58% of those who said so were willing to report it. In addition, it shows that public sector workers showed more awareness of misconduct in their organization than those in the private sector did.
ACCESSION #
45214029

 

Related Articles

  • By the Numbers.  // Employee Benefit News;Apr2010, Vol. 24 Issue 5, p43 

    The article discusses survey results about investments in wellness programs including 21 as the number of implemented wellness programs, 2% of total health claim money spent on wellness programs annually and 51% of employers who are planning to implement health improvement programs.

  • 2011 Compensation Survey. Bowker, Michael // 24x7;Dec2011, Vol. 16 Issue 12, p10 

    The article reports on the results of the 2011 Compensation Survey in the U.S. The survey found that satisfaction is high in spite of troubling issues. Participants of the survey showed satisfaction with salaries and other compensation and the overall value and importance of their work. The...

  • DIFFERENCES IN RESPONSE RATES USING MOST RECENT VERSUS FINAL DISPOSITIONS IN TELEPHONE SURVEYS. McCarty, Christopher // Public Opinion Quarterly;Fall2003, Vol. 67 Issue 3, p396 

    This article examines the differences between response rates calculated using the most recent versus in telephone surveys. The most recent disposition of a sampled telephone number is the disposition coded on the last call attempt. The final disposition is the disposition considered the most...

  • Some Factors Influencing the Random Sampling of College Students. Abeles, Norman; Brown, William F. // Public Opinion Quarterly;Winter54/55, Vol. 18 Issue 4, p419 

    In conducting attitude-opinion surveys on college populations, it is often assumed that a sample obtained by taking every fifth student will yield a sample representative of the institution or even of college students in general. Despite efforts of the investigators to account for as many...

  • A STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF FACTOR IMPORTANCE WEIGHTINGS ON JOB SATISFACTION MEASURES. Staples, D. Sandy; Higgins, Christopher A. // Journal of Business & Psychology;Winter98, Vol. 13 Issue 2, p211 

    This study empirically tests Locke's theory that the importance of a job satisfaction factor to an individual is already reflected in the individual's responses to the specific questions, Responses from a job satisfaction survey carried out by a large Canadian company were analyzed using a...

  • The Reader Poll.  // Outlook Weekly;3/11/2009, Vol. 13 Issue 36, p04 

    The article presents the results of a survey which asked readers to describe their current employment/job situation. About 61% of respondents say they are happy in their jobs and are not planning to leave. Another 11% say they are unemployed and are looking for a job while 6% say they are not...

  • When it comes to work, size does matter. Plummer, John // Third Sector;9/24/2008, p16 

    The article discusses the results of the second annual staff survey conducted by the periodical "Third Sector" and Birdsong Charity Consulting in Great Britain in 2008. According to the survey, people from medium-sized organisations with staff ranging from 51 to 200 are the most satisfied at...

  • Getting Older and Better.  // Chain Store Age;Mar2006, Vol. 82 Issue 3, p26 

    The article reports on the findings by research firm Maritz Research in its recent survey of retail employees, as of March 2006. The majority of retail employees 72 percent enjoy their interactions with the customers they encounter. Younger retail employees are significantly less likely to enjoy...

  • Why response rates are declining. Edmonston, Jack // Advertising Age's Business Marketing;Sep97, Vol. 82 Issue 8, p12 

    Reports that marketing researchers have announced that there has been a decline in response rates particularly in high technology markets. What is responsible for the decline; Reference to the Simmons Market Research Bureau's ComPro V study; Comments from Steve Douglas, general partner and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics